‘Time Bomb’ is Paul Moody’s hushed indie-folk narrative on the struggles of intimacy

Time is a strange and intangible concept that we try to wield control over with our sense of seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months and years. In many ways, time seems in infinite supply, but there’s no denying that we’re all at its mercy. One artist who grapples with the weight of this reality in his new single ‘Time Bomb’ is Paul Moody, the Woodstock, New York based singer, songwriter and musician.

His hushed, folky narrative style is akin to Tallest Man on Earth and the Felice Brothers, with the subtle commercial appeal of Ben Howard. As you’ll hear, the mellow atmosphere of ‘Time Bomb’ brings the listener in close proximity with those unique vocal tones, with all their emotional intent. The harmonious flow of Keith Goodwin‘s voice drifts over the rich acoustic soundscape of intricately plucked guitars. At certain points those strings are joined by homely accordion (performed by Robert Felice); these moments really intensify that willingness to open up oneself to connection and, by the same token, rejection.

Here, Moody explains a little more behind the meaning of this luscious indie-folk single:

“Time Bomb is about struggling with intimacy. The things that get in the way of us loving and being loved. Even though this song is a warning to a lover and a weary rebuttal of the love they are offering – there is a longing for surrender, a plea for help to reach the other side.”

‘Time Bomb’ will feature on an album project set to arrive in October this year, featuring songs written in Nashville, Tennessee, and recorded in upstate New York in a cabin in the woods. Be sure to keep up with Paul Moody for more tracks and that highly-anticipated record.

You can also find ‘Time Bomb’ in our Folk This Way playlist.

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